Monthly Archives: October 2017

The Blarg No. 58: Tom Petty Tribute

No soapbox this week. Sorry, I know I’ve been up there a lot lately, and you know what they say of opinions and assholes and all that…

I go running every morning. It’s something I do. At this point, I’m not sure whether I enjoy it, or I’ve got a problem—there’s a very fine line. This isn’t about that, though. I have a regular path I run on every morning before work, one that I like because it’s a decent area, but also there’s not much traffic at 3:30 in the morning. Occasionally, there are other runners, people out walking the dog, but for the most part it’s dark, quiet, and cool (soon it will be cold, but that’s another matter). Nothing much happens, I just listen to a podcast and do my thing.

Which is why it was simultaneously jarring and slightly mystical when I happened upon a pack of coyotes slinking their way across Missouri Ave, just north of Central. There were three of them that I saw—two ahead of a third, who stood frozen. They didn’t make a move to approach me, and I was waiting to let them pass, but this last one seemed determined to see me go first—much to the apparent chagrin of the other two, whose attitude exuded an air of, “Come on, man, what the hell are you waiting for?”—so I carried on my way, and then they went theirs. That was it. It was Monday morning, October 2nd. Later that day, the news came down of Tom Petty’s death. I couldn’t help thinking that those coyotes were somehow connected.

It seems like we’ve lost an overwhelming amount of iconic musicians lately. This is bound to happen. Life is one long, inexorable march past the end of the cliff. Some people sprint ahead and skip to the end, impatient perhaps, and then others are propelled forward, or pulled forward maybe, taken when it seems they still have work to do, and it is no less tragic to lose those that wait out the plot. There’s always a little twinge of hurt, the sense of some string being cut, but there are a few where it feels as though you’ve lost a limb, the musicians whose songs have woven an inextricable sense-memory into the threads of our personal histories. Joe Strummer, The Go-Betweens’ Grant McLennan, and now, Tom Petty.

This week, Jason Woodbury and I sit and discuss what Tom Petty meant to us—the songs we love, the memories they’re linked to. It’s a personal appreciation, a tribute from two lifelong fans—a conversation that I think anyone who can remember where they were when they first played their Full Moon Fever cassette, or when they first saw The Heartbreakers descending the escalator in the “Free Fallin'” video with “all the vampires walking through the valley” can relate to and maybe take something from.

Best,
Jared Duran

Listen to LE 58 – Tom Petty Tribute

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The Blarg No. 57: Charissa Lucille

Is anyone else out there fucking sick of the news? When did even our most stalwart, no-nonsense journalistic organizations fall prey to the model of news as entertainment? I’ve noticed that lately, even NPR has given itself over to a tone of sensationalism—sounding often more like a radio drama than the last bastion of straightforward, unbiased news reporting it did even just a few years ago. I point especially to recent hurricane coverage, and the mass shooting in Las Vegas. I know that these are horrific events negatively impacting the lives of countless people—I don’t need to feel as though my feelings are being manipulated in the process. There’s a tone you don’t hear in the older reporters, like Robert Siegel, and like Robert Siegel, these reporters are retiring. Pretty soon, everyone is going to sound like fucking Wolf Blitzer. Anyway…

Now to the more important point. Part of this journalistic style is breaking the story. Nevermind getting it right the first time, because you can always retract, yeah? Here I’m thinking of the news of Tom Petty’s death. That shit was fucked up. Yes, Tom Petty was a national treasure rightfully adored by millions, and as a fan myself, it was hard to read the news of his death, infuriating to read of its retraction, and then even worse to have to read it a second time. What do you think that did to his family? His close friends? It is that need in our instant access society to know everything now—especially when it comes to celebrity—that effectively stripped the Petty family of the right to live in hope and love and come to terms with this personal tragedy in private. Privacy is not a luxury, it’s a necessity, and I think that, as a whole, we are rapidly losing sight of this very crucial element of the human condition.

This week I talk to the fantastic Charissa Lucille, creator of Fem Static Zine, owner and operator of Wasted Ink Zine Distro (WIZD), and organizer of Phx Zine Fest (coming up on October 22nd!). We talked a lot about zines, their place in society, art, and culture, as well as the struggles faced creating a business and movement in a place as sprawling as Phoenix quite clearly is, and the success that’s shone through along the way.

Best,
Jared

Listen to LE 57 – Charissa Lucille

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The Blarg No. 56: Howl Theatre Project

2017 has a lot to answer for, but it’s offered up some amazing moments as well—for Limited Engagement in particular and myself along the way. It’s been rough but rewarding keeping up with the weekly format. I kinda miss the monthly live show, but if I bring it back, it needs to be something that sets it apart from the regular podcast—something special. I’m not sure what that something is yet, hence the continued hiatus as hurl ourselves into October, hoping to burst across December’s finish line. Hoot N Waddle is coming along, slowly but surely. It’s not where I was hoping it would be yet, but patience is something I’ve never been great with. We’re doing Hoot N Waddle right, and that takes time.

To that end, we launched our first podcast on the network, a partnership with Jessie Balli and Chatterbox, the appropriately titled Chatterpod. You can hear the pilot as a Limited Engagement episode (LE 50), and the first official show on the Chatterpod landing page (more episodes are coming soon, I promise). Also, this last week, I recorded a show for Leah Marche and Mike Pfister at The Nash—it was fucking awesome. I’m not sure exactly how or when that is going to come out, but it’s a long-term partnership, and there are more shows to come. Then, this month we’ll be setup over at Phx Zine Fest to record anyone interested in sharing their experience—vendors and attendees alike. Should be fun.

Adding to the milestone of our “Best Podcast” nod from PHOENIX Magazine in their Best of the Valley issue, Phoenix New Times just named Limited Engagement “Best Cultural Podcast” in their Best of Phoenix 2017 issue. It’s really cool to have the show acknowledged and legitimized in the media like this, but I’ve gotta say, it stresses me out a little. Now, I feel like I’ve got more people paying attention, and when you’re named the best of anything, there’s this tendency for people to wait for something to slip quality-wise, so they can say, “Eh, that show’s not that great.” I’ve just got to keep my head down and keep doing what I’ve been doing. I think I can handle that without imploding. I’ll let you know.

This week, I talk to Chris Danowski, Bethanne Abramovich, Jamie Haas Hendricks, and Jake Jack Hylton of Howl Theatre Project. I had a blast talking to these guys. Somehow we managed to get completely absurd while weaving in a serious discussion on the state of independent theatre in Phoenix, as well as talk about the craft and work involved in mounting a stage production. Their most recent show is The New Phoenicians, and if you ever have the opportunity to check out anything they do, you absolutely should, because they’re awesome.

Listen to LE 56 – Howl Theatre Project

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