Category Archives: Reviews

The Blarg No. 97: Best Music of 2018

First off, I want to thank everyone for their responses to last week’s Blarg, or the excerpt of it that was included in the Hoot n Waddle Dispatch. I’m fine, or at least I will be. The whole point of taking the break is to avoid the darkness. So this’ll be the last Limited Engagement of 2018, and I’ll be taking the first several weeks of 2019 off to regroup and put together a more workable schedule. Thank you for all the support. The show’s not going anywhere.

Now, let’s get into this episode, which is the annual best of music episode. This time around, I talked to Ashley Naftule (on for his third appearance!), and had a blast. Ashley is always a lot of fun to talk to, and while there’s some crossover in the sort of music we listen to, there were no repeats between us, so it made for a very lively conversation. Major thanks to Ashley, who was still getting over a cold, for sitting down and doing this show. For those who may not know, Ashley is a writer, performer, and he does a lot of great work with Space 55, so please check all that out.

Since I’m posting the lists, I’ll put the links to the show here, so you don’t have to scroll all the way to the bottom, and I’ll also say thank you to everyone who’s listened to this show. 2018 was a big year, and 2019 is going to be even bigger. As they say, watch this space.

To listen to LE 97 – Best Music of 2018 with Ashley Naftule:
(Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | Website)

I’m going to post Ashley’s list first, and then my overall list, which ranks everything.

Ashley’s list:

1. Fucked Up “Dose Your Dreams”

2. Beach House “7”

3. Deafheaven “Ordinary Corrupt Human Love”

4. YOB “Our Raw Heart”

5. Earl Sweatshirt “Some Rap Songs”

6. Rolo Tomassi “Time Will Die and Love Will Bury It”

7. SOPHIE “OIL OF EVERY PEARL’S UN-INSIDES”

8. BODEGA “Endless Scroll”

9. Iceage “Beyondless”

10. JPEGMAFIA “Veteran”

Honorable Mentions (i.e. Albums that reeeallly came close to cracking the top ten):

Advance Base “Animal Companionship”
American Pleasure Club “A Whole Fucking Lifetime Of This”
Arctic Monkeys “Tranquility Base Hotel & Casino”
Boygenius “s/t EP”
Lucy Dacus “Historian”
Jean Grae/Quelle Chris “Everything’s Fine”
Let’s Eat Grandma “I’m All Ears”
Makaya McCraven “Universal Beings”
Jeff Rosenstock “POST”
Sylvaine “Atoms Aligned, Coming Undone”
Unreqvited “Mosaic I: l’amour et l’ardeur”
Young Fathers “Cocoa Sugar”
Yves Tumor “Safe in the Hands of Love”

My list (Ranking Out of 10):

  1. Soccer Mommy – Clean 9.8/10
  2. The Good, The Bad & The Queen – Merrie Land 9.7/10
  3. Cat Power – Wanderer 9.6/10
  4. The Beths – Future Me Hates Me 9.5/10
  5. Elvis Costello & The Imposters – Look Now 9.4/10
  6. Neko Case – Hell-On 9.3/10
  7. Snail mail – Lush 9.2/10
  8. Jeff Tweedy – Carm 9.1/10
  9. The Nels Cline 4 – Currents, Constellations 9/10
  10. Marianne Faithfull – Negative Capability 8.95/10
  11. The Love Language – Baby Grand 8.9/10
  12. John Grant – Love Is Magic 8.85/10
  13. Ohmme – Parts 8.8/10
  14. L.A. Salami – The City of Bootmakers 8.75/10
  15. Calexico – The Thread That Keeps Us 8.7/10
  16. Wild Pink – Yolk In the Fur 8.65/10
  17. The Breeders – All Nerve 8.6/10
  18. Laura Viers – The Lookout 8.55/10
  19. Neil & Liam Finn – Lightsleeper 8.5/10
  20. Stephen Malkmus and the Jicks – Sparkle Hard 8.45/10
  21. Cowboy Junkies – All That Reckoning 8.4/10
  22. Parquet Courts – Wide Awake 8.35/10
  23. Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever – Hope Downs 8.3/10
  24. Damien Jurado – The Horizon Just Laughed 8.25/10
  25. Nap Eyes – I’m Bad Now 8.2/10
  26. Gorillaz – The Now Now 8.15/10
  27. Sam Phillips – World On Sticks 8.1/10
  28. Cut Worms – Hollow Ground 8/10
  29. First Aid Kit – Ruins 7.95/10
  30. Lord Huron – Vide Noir 7.9/10
  31. Amen Dunes – Freedom 7.85/10
  32. Valley Queen – Supergiant 7.8/10
  33. La Luz – Floating Features 7.75/10
  34. Kurt Vile – Bottle it In 7.7/10
  35. Wye Oak – The Louder I Call, The Faster it Runs 7.65/10
  36. Tony Molina – Kill the Lights 7.6/10
  37. Grant-Lee Phillips – Widdershins 7.55/10
  38. The Essex Green – Hardly Electronic 7.5/10
  39. The Milk Carton Kids – All the Things I Did and All the Things That I Didn’t Do 7.45/10
  40. The Innocence Mission – Sun On the Square 7.4/10
  41. J Mascis – Elastic Days 7.35/10
  42. Totally Mild – Her 7.3/10
  43. Kyle Craft – Full Circle Nightmare 7.25/10
  44. Tomberlin – At Weddings 7.2/10
  45. Caroline Rose – Loner 7.15/10
  46. The Jayhawks – Back Roads and Abandoned Motels 7.1/10
  47. Lanegan/Garwood – With Animals 7/10
  48. Field Music – Open Here 6.95/10
  49. Traceyanne & Danny 6.9/10
  50. Phosphorescent – c’est la vie 6.85/10
  51. Low – Double Negative 6.8/10
  52. They Might Be Giants – I Like Fun 6.75/10
  53. The Sidekicks – Happiness Hours 6.7/10
  54. Marc Ribot – Songs of Resistance 6.65/10
  55. The Blood Feud Family Singers – Adversary 6.6/10
  56. David Byrne – American Utopia 6.55/10
  57. Titus Andronicus – A Productive Cough 6.5/10
  58. Loma 6.45/10
  59. Marissa Nadler – For My Crimes 6.4/10
  60. Yo La Tengo – There’s a Riot Going On 6.35/10
  61. The Invisible Teal – Debt and Quandaries 6.3/10
  62. Josh Rouse – Love in the Modern Age 6.25/10

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A Review of Robyn Hitchcock at the MIM, Phoenix, AZ, 3.3.16

“I’m Not Fully Reconditioned Yet”
Among the reasons for going to a Robyn Hitchcock concert—of which there are more than you might think, and only one of which is the high quality of the music performed—is Robyn’s stage banter. Though he tends to mine similar themes, there is no hearing the same story twice—unless you follow his entire tour, then maybe you’ll hear some retreads, but as most of the banter evolves from his sense of the place he’s in, it seems terribly unlikely, and perhaps it was that the show fell on the occasion of his 63rd birthday, perhaps it was the fact that the size of the audience in attendance was much more robust than the pathetic number that turned out for his last concert at the MIM over three years previously, but RH appeared to be in an altogether more relaxed, less cynical mood, and not at all concerned with the fact that he was playing in a museum (something that seemed to stick in his craw the last time).

This time, Robyn’s banter centered on the dryness of the air; the idea of preconceived notions (and how they can’t apply to Phoenix); something about flies that seemed quite funny at the time; a free-form story about how he hasn’t been fully reconditioned yet, and how when you’re not fully reconditioned bits of you move five seconds behind the other bits; and occasional requests to “Bob,” such as, “Could you make this guitar sound like a 12-string, and also make it sound like I play really well.”  In other words, he was in fine form.

Hitchcock’s set featured a couple of new tunes that are most likely for the forthcoming album he’s spoken of in recent interviews. One might be called “I Pray When I’m Drunk,” and the other might be “I’m a Loser”—these titles are solely speculation based on choruses, and they were quite good. There were plenty of what some might call “standards” or “hits”: “Madonna of the Wasps,” “Balloon Man,” “Raymond Chandler Evening,” and “Queen Elvis”; the classic Soft Boys tune, “I Got the Hots for You”; the requested “A Skull, a Suitcase, and a Long Red Bottle of Wine.” My favorite songs of the evening though were the deeper catalogue and rare cuts such as “Man with a Woman’s Shadow,” “Nietzsche’s Way,” “Sometimes a Blonde,” “Trams of Old London,” and “Glass Hotel.” The encore, as appears to now be the standard for Hitchcock, consisted of a group of covers, the first a solo rendition of his favorite song—which he claimed as his birthday indulgence—Dylan’s gorgeously meandering “Sade Eyed Lady of the Lowlands,” then The Psychedelic Furs’ “The Ghost in You” and Neil Young’s “Motion Pictures” joined by Emma Swift on harmonies.

The setlist is by no means complete, and not at all in order. For a complete setlist in the order played, please consult someone with a better memory for that sort of thing.

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A Review of Wild Stab by The I Don’t Cares

I carefully avoided any press/advance reviews for Wild Stab, the new Paul Westerberg album, because I think that critics tend to be inadvertently dismissive, and I didn’t want my initial impressions to be influenced in any way. Yes, I said “Paul Westerberg album,” even though it is billed as The I Don’t Cares—a collaboration between Westerberg and Juliana Hatfield. I like Juliana Hatfield (her presence here, whether in the background or at the fore on songs like “Dance to the Fight” is a welcome counterweight), and I don’t intend to discount or diminish whatever contribution she made to the record, but having listened to quite a lot of work from both parties, what I hear in Wild Stab is a Paul Westerberg album, and one of the best of his career at that.

Who knows, I could be completely wrong, and the ragged nature of the body of work of both artists could point to an enmeshed, deeply rooted collaboration and partnership. However, after many listens to the subtle layers—the occasional horn stab, the deft keyboard riff, the drums that sound like a man trying to beat out all the rhythm inherent in them in a joyous crash that speaks more to innate ability and sheer bloody mindedness than any actual training—are all the hallmarks of every Westerberg release since his final major label outing, Suicaine Gratification—an album ironically prescient with the reprisal of the punched up, yet still gorgeous “Born for Me.”

Almost casually, haphazardly tossed in among the loose, party atmosphere that permeates and buoys the album throughout, with its lighter, easily tossed off moments (see the endearingly childlike and catchy “½ 2P” and just shy of saccharine “Kissing Break”) are moments of genius songwriting. It’s as though Westerberg is taunting us with his “yeah, I just had these old things lying around” hands in pockets embarrassed shrug moments that most songwriters would give a favorite piece of anatomy to write and Westerberg drops like spare change in a cup. I’m talking about the trio of gems “Back,” “King of America,” and “Hands Together.” These three songs alone are worth the price of admission.

“Back” has a fairly simple lyric that could be interpreted a surface level as Westerberg’s long overdue return to the realm of recorded music, or in a plaintively romantic context—either one with the understanding that he’s only “back if you’ll have [him] just as [he is].” The song chugs along in sonically familiar Westerberg-ian territory, but that seems to be the point, and it’s possibly his best album opener since Suicaine Gratification‘s (there’s that album again) “It’s a Wonderful Lie.”

“King of America” should be a hit single, but it won’t be. To fit the radio pallet, it would need to be run through the studio mill to emerge with a glossy sheen. However, all the elements are there, and as it stands, it’s a fantastic working class anthem, as well as one of Westerberg’s finest recorded moments, topped on this album only by its closing epic.

When I arrived at “Hands Together,” Wild Stab’s final track, during my first run through, I got goosebumps. The riff is simple, but it rings out with a gorgeous arpeggio picking the likes of which any long-suffering (that’s right, I said “suffering”) ‘Mats/Westerberg fans have known since songs like “Unsatisfied” and “Skyway” signifies the arrival of an important, cherished track. As such, from the opening lyrics about attending Ty Cobb’s funeral and dancing with Miss Garbo to the closing choral fade, “Hands Together” is most assuredly one of those tracks, one that—even at nearly seven minutes in length—feels as though it’s over too quickly.

Others will doubtless argue to the contrary, but this is a perfect Westerberg album. Perfect not in the traditional sense of perfection, but in the Westerberg sense—an unmatched alchemy of imperfect, half-baked, yet enjoyable tracks and songs that are easily placed alongside the best in his cannon. Anyone who has listened to him from the first Replacements album on up knows that Westerberg needs the freedom to stab wildly and that, given the room, he will hit the mark more often than not.

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