Tag Archives: poetry

The Blarg No. 96: Annual Check-In with RD

You may notice that there was no Blarg 95. I’d started writing one. I don’t even remember what I was writing. It couldn’t have been that important. I was either recording or editing podcasts up until midnight, and I was just done. And that sort of continues to be the case.

I’m sure I’ve brought this up on multiple occasions, but I’m going to do it again, because it’s my Blarg, and I can complain if I want to. I am one half of the team that runs Hoot n Waddle. HnW, as our snazzy new banner says, is “An Independent Publishing and Digital Media Company,” and under that, I currently produce, record, and edit 6 podcasts (2 are in I guess what you would call pre-production), plus host or co-host 4 of them, and then I have to book guests on two of those; on the publishing side, there’s reading submissions, agonizing over selecting work to send acceptance letters, the demoralizing task of sending rejection letters, then there’s the editing, working with the writers…there’s a lot of stuff.

All of the above, plus the stress of the M-F, 9 to 5 (or 6-3 in my case), has led to a retreat to an unhealthy vice as a coping mechanism. Drinking is pretty much the only vice I have left—that and binge eating—and it’s getting to an unhealthy level. I was looking at the podcasts I’ve recorded over the past couple of weeks, and it occurred to me that I was drunk during the recording of every single one of them. If I didn’t say anything, you might not even notice (except for one of them, but I’ll let you figure out which one), but I know it, and it’s not something I’m proud of.

Consequently, I’m taking a little break. You’ve got this episode, the annual check-in with Rosemarie Dombrowski, then there’ll be next week’s episode, the annual music best of, which will be with Ashley Naftule this year (the RD and the music episodes are pretty much the only annual traditions we have), and that’ll be it for a little while. As I typed that I just realized that I may have one more time-sensitive one on the horizon… Other than that, though, I need to recharge, figure some things out, bank some interviews, and most importantly, find some new coping mechanisms that won’t kill my liver.

And having said all that, it’s not like you won’t hear a lot from me anyway—Jason and I are taking a short break between seasons of What the Fork?, but we’re going to do two special episodes in January; Jenna and I will still do a Hoot n Review every other week (though there may be a short break there as well); and then there’s the new podcast, Album Infinitum, which I’ll be prepping over the holidays for launch at the start of 2019. Trust me, there will be plenty of me out there for you to fill your head with. Probably too much.

Rosemarie Dombrowski is a professor at ASU’s downtown Phoenix campus, the inaugural Phoenix Poet Laureate, the founder of Rinky Dink Press, the author of three collections of poetry, and she would not be terribly happy if I continued to go on and on about all her awards, etc., it’s one of the things she talks about on this episode—along with so much more. So. Much. More. And that’s after I cut a chunk out.

It’s a lovely, fun conversation, and I’m so happy it’s on record.

Listen to LE 96 – Annual Check-In with Rosemarie Dombrowski:
(Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify | Website)

Best,

Jared

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The Blarg No. 93: LIVE with Andrea Scarpino and Matt Bell

The holidays are a problematic time of year for me, or at least they have been historically. The fact that my birthday is December 22nd didn’t help much, nor did a dysfunctional family life, or working in retail for more than 15 years. The season has pretty much been ruined for me—at least from a traditional consumerist and familial standpoint. The season and weather on their own comprise my favorite time of year. One of the perks of living in Arizona, I suppose.

Not working in a retail setting any longer, I actually manage to get Thanksgiving weekend off. It’s been great. I probably should have been doing a lot more work, but I needed a break. I edited and put up this episode of Limited Engagement, put up the new What the Fork?, but that’s pretty much it. There are manuscripts to be read, I’ve got a number of new podcasts to edit—it’ll all wait. I’ve decided instead to start watching James Bond from the beginning. As I’m writing this, I’m also watching Dr. No. I’ve seen almost all of the James Bond films, but it’s been quite some time for most of them, and there are a couple of the Daniel Craig films that I’ve never seen. This renewed interest, I have to say, was spurned on by discovering and listening to the James Bonding podcast with Matts Gourley and Mira.

There’s a lot of peril in revisiting something like this, because of the racism, sexism, and so forth. There are some properties best left in the past, but I couldn’t resist. Dr. No is exactly as awful and simultaneously wonderful as I could have hoped for. There has got to be some sort of allowance for the magic and power of classic cinema, or what have we got left? Nothing is perfect, it’s never going to be, and if I can’t enjoy an old film despite all of its inherent social flaws, what’s the point? Of anything? We can’t go back and fix everything, because that’s not progress. James Bond is a racist, sexist, bigoted, terrible human being. I’m still going to enjoy the films. I’m a pacifist, but I love a good war epic. I don’t think our entertainment necessarily has to reflect our values. Especially when it’s 50 years old.

I don’t know exactly where I’m going with that, and I’m going to go ahead and bypass the soapbox rather than stand on it.

Longtime listeners to the podcast will know that it’s been well over a year since I’ve done a live edition of Limited Engagement. There are a number of reasons for this, most of which I’ve already discussed at length, so I don’t see the point in going over them again. Having gone so long without doing one, though, I was more than a little bit apprehensive. With how stressed and anxious I’ve been lately, I had some serious doubts as to whether I’d have my mojo working. It seems like everything went okay. I apparently now have some sort of “podcast host brain” that kicks in as soon as the recording starts. The questions and conversation just flow. I don’t know, maybe I’m wrong. You as the listener will be the final judge.

Regardless of where you come down on the quality of my abilities as a host, there’s no arguing that Andrea Scarpino and Matt Bell are fantastic guests. This is another one of those indispensable craft talks for anyone looking to grow and learn as a writer. Andrea’s latest collection, Once Upon Wing Lake, has just been republished by Hoot n Waddle, so you can get that through our shop or locally through Changing Hands bookstores, and Matt’s latest, A Tree or a Person or a Wall, is available wherever books are sold. Matt and Andrea are both wonderful writers, and I cannot recommend their work highly enough.

I’d just like to round back to the holidays quickly before I wrap this up. They can often be extraordinarily stressful and depressing, and should you find yourself in a position where you need to reach out, I’d like to make myself available. If you write to ltd.engagement@gmail.com, I will respond to you and attempt to be useful to you in whatever way I can–even if that is simply being a sympathetic ear.

Cheers and best wishes to you,

Jared

Listen to LE 93 – LIVE with Andrea Scarpino and Matt Bell

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The Blarg No. 91: Todd Hoover

Meanwhile, in Arizona, we still have no fucking idea who our next senator is. In case it wasn’t abundantly clear, I’m pulling for Kyrsten Sinema. I have my problems with her record, but I believe the alternative to be far worse. As of this writing, Sinema currently holds the lead with nearly 50 percent of the vote. Let’s hope things stay that way.

We also managed to flip The House, so at the very least, there’s at least a check if not necessarily a balance. We’ll have to wait and see what happens at this point. I’m cautious. Note that I’m not cautiously optimistic. I don’t think we’re anywhere near optimism yet, but I am a pessimist and a cynic, so you know, take that for what it’s worth.

If you’re a writer in Arizona, and you’re reading this on Monday, you might be interested in this contest Hoot n Waddle has going on in partnership with the Virginia G. Piper Center for Creative Writing. Our friends at Piper have given HnW two spots at Andrea Scarpino’s Poetry of the Body workshop, which takes place on Saturday, 11/17 at 10 am, and the reason they’ve done this is because the workshop takes place right before our event to re-launch Andrea’s book Once Upon Wing Lake as a Hoot n Waddle title (it was originally published last year by Four Chambers Press). The event is a live Limited Engagement—the first live show I’ve done in over 18 months—and the guests will be Andrea and writer Matt Bell. All you have to do for a chance to win one of the workshop spots is share our Facebook event and tag Hoot n Waddle in your post. We’ll pick two names at random and message the winners privately.

I had a really interesting conversation with Todd Hoover (who records and releases music under the name The Invisible Teal). He was once a very religious person who went so far as to attend seminary school, but has since denounced religion in the wake of some personal events and self-realizations. His story is fascinating, and his music is a complex, eclectic delight. Todd’s latest album is called Debt and Quandaries, and he plays two tracks from it at the end of the show (“Line of Dots” and “Willey Siegel”). You can check out The Invisible Teal on Bandcamp.

Best,
Jared

Listen to LE 91 – Todd Hoover

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The Blarg No. 78: Katie Manning

As I write this, it’s Phoenix Comi—sorry, sorry, Phoenix Comic Fest time! Like the High Holidays, but for nerds, such as myself. We walk the halls en masse, we recognize each other’s costumes and t-shirts without irony, we buy stuff we absolutely do not need. It’s amazing. It will also be over by the time you read this, so if you went as well, I hope we all had a good time.

Phoenix New Times listed us in their list of “Phoenix Podcasts You Need to Hear”, which is really cool. It’s really surreal to see the podcast getting more and more attention. I’ve been doing this show for three years now, and I can’t tell you how many times I wondered to myself if anyone was even listening, let alone thinking it was any good. I’d like to take a brief moment to thank everyone who’s been a guest on the show, and a few people who have been particularly supportive: Leah LeMoine, Mike Pfister, Amy Hagerty, and Cynthia Black.

Quick bit of business: Hoot n Waddle, our little publishing and digital media company, is currently accepting manuscript submissions via Submittable. Please read the guidelines, and if you have anything that fits the bill, please send it our way.

On this edition of Limited Engagement, I talk with poet and professor, Katie Manning. Tasty Other, Manning’s first full length collection of poetry and the recipient of the 2016 Main Street Rag Poetry Book Award, chronicles the experience of her first pregnancy through surrealistic dream, religious allusion, and striking imagery that conveys all the love, hope, and anxiety that clinical texts can’t begin to relate. Get yourself a copy of Katie’s book.

Listen to LE 78 – Katie Manning

Best,

Jared

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The Blarg No. 76: Omar Pimienta and Jose Antonio Villaran

First, the cat update. For anyone following our Instagram account (@limitedengagement), you know that we are once more sharing our home with a cat—and I purposely don’t say “own,” because I don’t think you ever really own a cat, they’re more kind of like that free-loading roommate who doesn’t clean up after themselves or pay their share of the rent. Her name is Susuwatari, after the little black soot creatures in the Miyazaki film My Neighbor Totoro. We’re calling her Susu for short. The name seems to suit her. She is, as was Alison (my previous cat, for newer listeners), a rescue from the Humane Society. Black cats are often mistreated and are hard to adopt out, and I have a fondness for them, so I do what I can. Susu has certainly dealt with some trauma (on top of being recently spayed, she’d been abandoned, and was pregnant), but she’s settling in nicely. She and Gizmo are still working out the kinks in their relationship, it’ll be fine. She’s weird, he’s weird—she likes having her belly rubbed, which is not a normal cat thing, and she likes headbutting stuff.

I spent some time writing poetry on demand again. This time it was for Independent Bookstore Day over at Changing Hands Phoenix. My second time now, and again I found it very freeing creatively. I’ve seen some of the writers I’ve done this with make notes and write rough drafts prior to typing up their finished pieces, but I composed one draft on the typewriter, and that was it. I’d never pretend that’s the best way to go about it, but it works for me. The Changing Hands requests were much more difficult than the ones I got on Roosevelt Row. For starters, I had to write a couple of poems suitable for children, then there was the woman who wanted something happy about retiring on a farm with pumpkins, goats, and chickens. About a third of the people wanted something happy. I don’t do happy.

All told, over the course of about 4 hours, I wrote 18 poems, which is nothing to sneeze at. They weren’t all great, but I actually really liked a few of them that I’ll probably rework and hang onto. I’ll post my favorites up on Instagram.

We went to see Infinity War last night, and I’ll probably talk a little bit about my impressions when I record the next Hoot N Review this week with Jenna Duncan, but I loved it. We’ll see where it falls in the rankings over time, but I think it’s possibly their best. At this point, they’ve reached a critical mass as far as the amount of characters goes, but they pulled it off. For a while there, I thought I was watching a Paul Thomas Anderson film with amazing special effects.

I had the opportunity recently to sit down with Omar Pimienta and Jose Antonio Villaran, the writer and translator respectively of The Album of Fences (available now from Cardboard House Press). With everything hitting the fan right now, it seemed like the perfect opportunity to have this discussion on the poetics and poetic politics of borders, the responsibility of artists (of all disciplines) to create work that speaks out against the prevailing rhetoric of fascism, social regression, and hatred. We got deep.

Best,
Jared

Listen to LE 76 – Omar Pimienta and Jose Antonio Villaran

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The Blarg No. 66: Rosemarie Dombrowski

Get your kicks on The Blarg 66? (Sorry)

If anything can be said to be the modus operandi of 2017, it’s one step up, 2000 steps back; a minor victory followed by countless setbacks; a brief moment of surfacing for air, then right back under water. You get the idea. After a massive effort to keep a pedophile out of congress—a victory so narrow as to not avoid contention or dispute—that same congress voted to end net neutrality, and they’re currently working overtime to push through the most blatantly anti-constituency tax plan ever. To say that the battle is uphill is an understatement of massive proportions. At this point, there is such a disconnect between the government and the people that democracy is flat-out broken, and any meaningful change would take a complete reset—one that could be achieved through votes, but that would first involve a shift in philosophy for the majority of people—a need to make informed, moral, rational, open-minded decisions rather than knee-jerk choices made out of fear and anger.

Barring that, though, here’s an idea: just bench men. The entire gender. There are always exceptions, and I like to think I’m one of them, but another theme of 2017 (and I know it’s not any sort of revelation, believe me) is the inability of men to consider anything beyond the immediate satisfaction of their erection. That can be most obviously seen in sexual misconduct, but it should be pretty obvious that this is likewise the case with all the money boners out there. “You’re giving me how much money? You need me to vote in favor of what? No problem! It’ll screw over which people? The ones who voted for me? Fuck ’em.” So, yes, I’m proposing we take men out of the equation altogether. Who knows, maybe women won’t do any better, maybe they’re equally as corrupt, but I think it’s worth a shot, and my main point is that things are so deeply messed up right now that we’ve got to do something big, drastic, and sweeping in order to progress and break out of this system which is currently hellbent on not only maintaining an arcane, outdated ideology, but dragging us further back into the depths.

One more thing before I put the soapbox away: I am so very, very tired of the standard “man versus Man” defense. Can we just throw that one out? Feeling the need to distinguish yourself as a proper example of the gender doesn’t make you any better, because that is still, in some way, arguing for the superiority of the gender. What really distances you? Being a decent person, that’s what does it. It seems like gender—especially as identity becomes increasingly fluid—needs to move back into the realm of scientific over social function. There are few ideas more exciting than the one that we are the manifestations of our complicated, chemical neural makeup, and not defined by something as simple and arbitrary as the stuff between our legs.

This all has very little to do with my conversation with Rosemarie Dombrowski. Other than the fact that we do spend a fair amount of time discussing the role of art in times of social unrest, turmoil, etc. We also discuss what it means to be the poet laureate of Phoenix, the difference between being a community poet and a feature, and the life-cycle of writing from inception to publication. This also marks Rosemarie’s 3rd appearance on the show (first solo appearance) during December, thus keeping the tradition alive!

Rosemarie Dombrowski is a Senior Lecturer at Arizona State University’s Downtown Phoenix campus where she is the co-founder and faculty editor of the student and community writing journal, Write On, Downtown, and where she teaches courses on the poetics of street art, women’s literature, and creative ethnography. Her collections include The Book of Emergencies (Five Oaks Press, 2014), which was the recipient of a 2016 Human Relations Indie Book Award for Poetry, The Philosophy of Unclean Things (Finishing Line Press, 2017), and the forthcoming The Cleavage Planes of Southwest Minerals [A Love Story], winner of the 2017 Split Rock Review chapbook competition. She is also the inaugural Poet Laureate of Phoenix, AZ, the founder of merge poetry journal (2005-11) and rinky dink press, an editor for Four Chambers journal and press, and the co-founder and host of the Phoenix Poetry Series, now in its tenth year.

Listen to LE 66 – Rosemarie Dombrowski

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The Blarg No. 65: Joy Young

Wearing sweaters as the world burns…

December showed up as it always does. Right on time. One moment it’s November 30th at 11:59 pm, and then, boom, December 1st is right there on top of things. Despite despising the holidays, I actually really like December. I’d say it’s probably my favorite month, and not just because I was born in it. I like the atmosphere, I like the crisp snap of the air, but above all I like wearing sweaters. I love wearing sweaters. I wish it were sweater weather all the time, but in Arizona, sweater time is very, very limited. I’m not weird about it or anything—I don’t have some weird sweater fetish—I like the softness of them, I like that you can get away with wearing them at work, and they’re super-comfortable, so it’s almost like you feel you’re getting away with something. I guess I should say “I” feel that way, because it is extraordinarily presumptive of me to think anyone else might feel the same.

This year, though, something feels off. I’m not getting to enjoy my sweater time as much as I normally do. Maybe, and I’m just hypothesizing here, it’s because it seems as though the entire world is either literally or metaphorically on fire. Hard to feel good about being comfy and cozy when you are also an empathetic person and paying attention to everything going on around you. Again, that “you” is presumptive, and I’m doing my best to quit presumption. I’m sure there’s some sort of presumptive support group or multi-step program, but I’m determined to quit presumption cold turkey.

I had a really fun conversation with Joy Young. I really like their work, and this was the first time I’ve had occasion to talk to them about their process, where their stories come from, and connect creatively. It turns out the reason for this might be that, although we’re both pretty active in similar, often connecting or intersecting literary circles, we’re also both pretty cripplingly shy and suffer from heavy social anxiety. It’s apparently not terribly uncommon for literary types who appear confident and have success on stage to be incredibly introverted. Who knew? Well, I did know actually, but it’s still nice to connect and not feel so alone.

Joy Young is a performance and teaching spoken word artist based in Phoenix, Az. Their poetry and workshops, much of which centers on transgressing borders, entering topics pertaining to social justice through poetic personal narratives has been featured on Button Poetry and Everyday Feminism as well as on stages and in colleges and classrooms across the country. Joy is a co-founder of Off the Page—a monthly recurring workshop and open mic at Wasted Ink Zine Distro that seeks to build connection and community within Phoenix’s diverse literary and performance communities. Learn more about them at https://www.joyyoungpoetry.com/

Best,
Jared

Listen to LE 65 – Joy Young

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